Why You Should Wash New Clothes Before Wearing Them !

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For most of us, wearing a new purchase while it’s still shop-fresh is a big part of the thrill of buying it in the first place.
However, according to one textile expert, not washing clothes after you’ve bought them leaves us wide open to both other people’s germs and a whole host of chemicals.

Let’s see what experts has to say about this:
Clothing expert Lana Hogue says not washing new clothes as soon as you’ve bought them can leave shoppers exposed to harmful chemicals
Azo-aniline dyes, used to colour garments, can be particularly irritating to the skin
Hogue explained to Elle.com that the dyes used to colour our clothes are particularly skin unfriendly.
‘You should absolutely wash clothes before you wear them. Especially anything that is right next to the skin or that you will sweat on.
‘Most of the chemicals used in dyeing fabric and putting finishes on yarns that allow them to be processed through spinning equipment are known irritants.’

Chemicals routinely used in the manufacture of new clothes include Formaldehyde resin and azo-aniline dyes.
Many synthetic fabrics get their hues from the azo-aniline dyes, which can cause a severe skin reaction in those who are allergic.
Formaldehyde resin is a colourless gas that is applied to some clothes to stop them from wrinkling and reduce the chance of mildew developing.
Pret-a-porter? Never a good idea, say the experts who advise on putting clothes in the washing machine at least once to rid them of the harsh processes they go through in factories
Pret-a-porter? Never a good idea, say the experts who advise on putting clothes in the washing machine at least once to rid them of the harsh processes they go through in factories
But it is also linked to skin irritation and allergic reactions, while some scientists even believe it can raise the risk of cancer.
Textiles are also sprayed with products and to make yarns fit into weaving machines, the fibres are often flattened with more chemicals.
American Hogue, who has worked in the clothing industry for more than 30 years, warns that all of the above can be a nightmare for people with sensitive skin and flare up conditions such as dermatitis.
Trying to steer towards natural fibres doesn’t help much either; even 100 per cent cotton garments are treated with chemicals before being sold.

The just-bought look can also leave shoppers vulnerable to other people’s germs as clothes can be tried on multiple times by multiple people before they find an owner
On top of the industry processes, there’s also the small matter of how many people interact with a piece of clothing before it reaches your wardrobe.
An item can be tried on multiple times by multiple people before it ends up being purchased meaning other people’s hair and dead skin cells could be hiding in your new frock.
Manufacturers of clothes sold in the UK are currently not required to disclose the use of anti-wrinkle chemicals on labels.

Source:www.healthylivingstyle.com

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